Go to content Go to navigation
Map
Houses in Trøndelag, Norway - Photo: Terje Rakke/Nordic life/Innovation Norway
  |  
Houses in Trøndelag, Norway Photo: Terje Rakke/Nordic life/Innovation Norway

Historical architecture

The Norwegian rose painting tradition developed from around 1750 and was both an imitation and in parts liberation from «guild art».

Guild art was based on set patterns; exact copies of ornamentation and motifs from the works of great European artists. With rose painting there grew up a freer artistic form, a unique folk art that reached its apex towards the beginning of the 1800's. Rose painting was a rural art form practised by local masters who travelled from farm to farm.

Some old log houses are magnificently carved and decorated. These rural artisans were not however immune to international trends, although impulses from the Continent were slow in reaching the villages.

In these old interiors we find elements from all of the great styles including renaissance, baroque, rococo and empire, blended with local tradition and strongly influenced by the individual artisan's taste and temperament. The result became a unique and exuberant folk art with acanthus vines and human figures, flowers and trees, Biblical scenes, soldiers and horsemen, often in bright, harmonious colours.

Learn more about Norway’s cultural history in the Norsk Folkemuseum.

Dragon style

Many Norwegian wooden buildings are built in dragon style, a style that is uniquely Norse and richly designed. It originated in the 1800's out of a growing interest for the animal decoration of the Viking period.

Norway was in the process of breaking out of a union with Sweden, and nationalism flourished. For a long time, the dragon style was considered to be the most tasteless manifestation of a glorification of the past. It was nonetheless kept when Holmenkollen Park Hotel in Oslo was restored.

Other handsome wooden hotels around the country - especially in Western Norway - have also come to realize their attraction value. Especially perhaps to foreign tourists who enjoy experiencing the unique qualities of the country they visit.

Ad
Ad
Last updated:  2012-05-29
Details from Urnes Stave Church, Norway - Photo: Jens Henrik Nybo/Innovation Norway
Details from Urnes Stave Church, Norway
Close
Embed this article

Copy and paste this code into your blog/website

Preview

Houses in Trøndelag, Norway - Photo: Terje Rakke/Nordic life/Innovation Norway

Historical architecture

The Norwegian rose painting tradition developed from around 1750 and was both an imitation and in parts liberation from «guild art».

Historical architecture

Source: Visitnorway

Related

Christmas in Norway

Experience Norwegian Christmas traditions by visiting a Christmas market, enjoying a holiday concert, or catching a glimpse of the northern lights.

Norway's national day

17 May is Norway's Constitution Day and is celebrated with children's parades and festivities.

Stave churches

Stave churches are an important part of Norway's architectural heritage. Urnes Stave Church in the Sognefjord is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Religion in Norway

Norse mythology held sway until Norway became Christian around the year 1000. Today there is religious freedom.

Partners

Kilden Performing Arts Centre in Kristiansand

Kilden Performing Arts Centre is located on the waterfront in Kristiansand. Kilden is a monumental landmark building for the arts in Southern Norway.

Featured videos

Related

Architecture

Historical architecture Historical architecture

Norwegian culture

Historical architecture Historical architecture
TEXT ADS
  • Ad
  • Ad
  • Ad
  • Ad
Ad
Ad