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Kragerø

Jomfruland and Stråholmen

Jomfruland and Stråholmen Photo: Espen Johannessen Jomfruland and Stråholmen Photo: Kragerø Sentrumforening Jomfruland and Stråholmen Photo: Terje Rakke Jomfruland and Stråholmen Photo: Angust Ringmann
Jomfruland and Stråholmen Photo: Espen Johannessen
Jomfruland and Stråholmen Photo: Kragerø Sentrumforening
Jomfruland and Stråholmen Photo: Terje Rakke
Jomfruland and Stråholmen Photo: Angust Ringmann

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Description

Jomfruland
Jomfruland is a long, flat island forming a protective barrier between the other islands and the open sea. Ferries make regular daily trips between it and the mainland. “Aur”, meaning gravelly, sandy soil mixed with boulders, was the island’s original name. It was first mentioned in the ancient sagas in 1207. The first mention in a written source of the present name, Jomfruland, was in 1513.

The island is a part of a glacial moraine stretching from the Baltic Sea through Sweden and along the Norwegian coast. The outer shore of the island consists of smooth stones and boulders, while the inner shore has sandy beaches along its entire length. A favourable climate and lush vegetation have attracted a great variety of birds: some 60 to 70 species nest here. Nature’s beauty is visible every spring in a special way for the mass of visitors who come to the pancake-flat island to view the marvellous flowering of the wood anemone among mighty, magical oak trees.

Jomfruland is also part of the Gea Norvegica Geological Park due to its importance position in European geology. The varied geology of this area is significant in both a national and an international context.

The island’s two lighthouses are well-known landmarks. The older lighthouse began operating in 1839, and ever since then has guided ships making their way into Kragerø. The lighthouse is 22 metres high and built of brick. In 1874, it was equipped with a foghorn, Norway’s first mechanical foghorn. The new lighthouse was built of iron 100 years later. It is 37 metres high. The old lighthouse, now considered one of Telemark’s most important historical sites, is run as a local museum during the summer months. A climb to its top rewards you with a superb view of the island, the open sea and the other islands. The Lighthouse-keeper’s Garden is a popular summer concert venue, while art exhibitions are arranged in the Keeper’s House.

Jomfruland’s outer and boulder-strewn shoreline faces the open sea. Glaciers carried these boulders from inland districts to the sea where they have been ground smooth by the force of the waves. Local vegetation is also marked by strong winds and harsh weather. The variations of the sea – from dead calm to violent breakers – make this shore a fascinating place to visit. One especially popular area, “Salt-stone”, is great for swimming and sunning on a warm summer’s day.

“Tårnbrygga”, the wharf nearest the lighthouses, is the centre of many attractions and the usual starting point for visitors’ tours. The surroundings of the nearby Haga Inn are well-suited for outdoor activities and recreation, while the sandy beach with its gradual and shallow slope is a perfect place for families with children. A marked and handicap-friendly nature/culture trail out to the Lighthouse Pond (“Tårntjerna”) starts in the leafy forests close by. This is where Theodor Kittelsen found the inspiration for his painting of the Water Sprite (“Nøkken”).

Stråholmen
Stråholmen is famous for its charming houses and is in many ways one of the coastal islands’ most exotic places. This island was originally a pilots’ station. According to tradition, pilots used to sit up on their housetops watching for the sight of masts and sails on the horizon. Keeping an eye on the sea was important because the first pilot to reach the ship got the job.

Tales are also told of storms and hurricanes, of ships being wrecked or running aground on the island and the reefs of these foul waters. In December 1907, a Finnish ship named the “Vallona” was wrecked off Stråholmen. 13 of her crew were lost in what was one of the worst shipwrecks in Kragerø’s history.

Stråholmen is also part of the moraine marking the extent of the last ice-age glacier. The island has a fine beach and wharf. Sheep directly descended from Viking breeds graze freely on the island in an effort to control vegetation and recreate the cultural landscape’s botanical variety.
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Jomfruland and Stråholmen - Photo: Espen Johannessen

Jomfruland and Stråholmen

Jomfruland Jomfruland is a long, flat island forming a protective barrier between the other islands and the open sea. Ferries make regular daily...

Jomfruland and Stråholmen

Source: Visitnorway

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Shopping in Kragerø

Shopping in Kragerø is a real pleasure. Specialist shops lie side by side along most of the town's narrow streets and lanes.

Where to stay in Kragerø

In Kragerø you can choose from variety of accommodation, whether you prefer a tent near a secluded cove or a luxurious suite at a spa hotel.

Key facts about Kragerø

Kragerø lies furthest south in the county of Telemark. The town is home to some 11,000 residents.

Kragerø

The cozy town of Kragerø is surrounded by islands and skerries, making it a favorite for experiencing coastal life and culture of Southern Norway.

What to do in Kragerø

Opportunities for an active holiday abound in Kragerø. Activities include cycling, canoeing, golf and sea rafting, among others.

Tour suggestions in Kragerø

The cluster of offshore islands with their own special features offers attractive tours. There are regular daily ferry routes to the main islands.
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