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Hiking up to the top of Fløya in the Lofoten Islands, Northern Norway - Photo: CH - Visitnorway.com
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Hiking up to the top of Fløya in the Lofoten Islands, Northern Norway Photo: CH - Visitnorway.com

Grading of hiking trails

Finding the hike that is right for you is easy with Norway’s grading system.
Emergency phone numbers
110 - Fire
112 - Police
113 - Ambulance
120 - Emergency at sea

To help hikers find their way in the Norwegian mountains and forests, and to ensure they choose the hike that is best suited to their ability, Norway uses a shared standard for grading all its marked paths. The trails are all colour-coded to let hikers know what to expect.

The different levels are also clearly marked in all of Visit Norway’s products, so you can easily choose a hike that suits your condition and ambition.

Find your level

Norway’s grading system is based on four difficulty levels used both nationally and internationally: green, blue, red and black. The trail grading colours (and the difficulty levels they correspond to) are as follow:

Green: Easy. Short hikes requiring no special skills, suitable for all. Trail type: asphalt, gravel, forest and good trails. Less than two hours in duration. Elevation difference: less than 200 metres.

Blue: Medium. For hikers with basic skills.  Less than four hours in duration. Trail type: like green trails, but can have more demanding stretches. Elevation difference: less than 400 metres.

Red: Challenging. For experienced hikers in good physical shape/condition. These hikes require appropriate hiking equipment. Trail type: trails, open terrain, rock, scree and bare rock. Less than six hours in duration. Elevation difference: less than 800 metres.

Black: Expert. Hikes suitable for experienced mountaineers only. Hikers must be in good physical shape/condition. The hikes require good hiking equipment, plus use of map and compass. Trail type: longer and/or more technically challenging than red trails. No maximum duration. Elevation difference: no maximum.

Stay safe

For information on how to stay safe in the Norwegian mountains, read these safety brochures:

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Last updated:  2014-08-20
The hike to Skagerflå in Geiranger, Fjord Norway, is colour-coded red - Photo: CH - Visitnorway.com
The hike to Skagerflå in Geiranger, Fjord Norway, is colour-coded red
Hiking the Besseggen Ridge – Jotunheimen National Park, Norway - Photo: Chris Arnesen - Visitnorway.com
Hiking the Besseggen Ridge – Jotunheimen National Park, Norway
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Hiking up to the top of Fløya in the Lofoten Islands, Northern Norway - Photo: CH - Visitnorway.com

Grading of hiking trails

Finding the hike that is right for you is easy with Norway’s grading system.

Grading of hiking trails

Source: Visitnorway

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