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Project Bandaloop - dance performances outdoor in the Stavanger Region, Norway - Photo: Peter McBride
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Project Bandaloop - dance performances outdoor in the Stavanger Region, Norway Photo: Peter McBride

Key facts about the Stavanger Region

The Stavanger region is an area of contrasts, from quiet mountain areas for hiking to a vibrant university city with many culinary delights.

Geography

The Stavanger region is the southernmost destination in Fjord Norway. The region offers beautiful long stretched beaches, pulsating city and cultural life, fjord and mountain landscapes as well as islands. The region is filled with contrasts; enjoy an active holiday with hikes to world famous attractions such as Preikestolen ("the Pulpit Rock") and Kjerag, kayaking, biking, surfing and kiting at the beaches of Jæren, hunting and fishing, or climbing in Sandnes.

The magnificent islands outside of Stavanger are nice for boating. In the southern part of the region, you can explore unique geological surroundings; actually, you need to travel all the way to the moon to experience similar terrain.

History

Remnants from the Viking Age, including the battle in Hafrsfjord in 872 AD, can be found in the region, with sites both in Sola and Stavanger.

In 1125 the Stavanger Cathedral was built, and made a large impact on the small town of Stavanger. Through the following centuries, the region remained poor, until 1810, when the herring came in large quantities to the coast. This gave the fishing industry a huge boost.

At the same time, the fishing industry's growth gave new opportunities to other industrial activities. Towards the end of the 1800s, the canning industry was developed, and tons of canned sardines were exported. In the mid-1950s new technical requirements led to the need to look for new industry. The shipping industry managed to keep renewing itself.

Economy

In 1969 the first oil field was discovered at Ekofisk, south in the North Sea, which made the Stavanger region a key player in the Norwegian economy. Today Stavanger isEurope's oil and energy capital, and the main source of income for local people comes from working in the petroleum sector.

Together with the petroleum industry you will also find aqua cultural and agricultural centres here. At Sola there is a Norwegian Centre for Aviation Technology. Farming and traditional industries are still important to the region.

Cultural and culinary capital

Stavanger is a university city, and home to a number of institutions of higher education and research.

The Stavanger region is Norway's food destination second to none – with culinary delights of excellent standard made from lamb, seafood, vegetables and fruit from local producers. The mild climate in the region is just right for agriculture; in addition, Stavanger has an active gastronomic environment in terms of research and development. Stavanger city centre offers good restaurants, shopping, cozy coffee shops in Øvre Holmegate, also known as the colourful street.

Scandinavia's largest food festival, Gladmat, is merely one of more than 30 large festivals and events taking place every year.

Information on current and upcoming cultural events in the Stavanger region can easily be found in the cultural calendar What's on? that lists upcoming events in different categories.

Stavanger and Sandnes were both chosen European capital of culture in 2008, a testimony to the rich cultural life in the region. The iconic Stavanger Concert Hall has been venue for world famous artists and in the later years, the host of the annual musical awards Spellemannprisen. Intimate concerts in combination with nature experiences; for instance enjoy an evocative musical event at Tungenes Lighthouse. The region also boasts a fantastic variety of museums, as well as several fun activities for kids and families, in addition to the popular theme park Kongeparken.

Population

  • Stavanger has 132 102 inhabitants.
  • Sandnes has 73 624 inhabitants.
  • Sola has 25 708 inhabitants.
  • Randaberg has 10 556 inhabitants.
  • Hå has 18 628 inhabitants.
  • Klepp has 18 741 inhabitants.
  • Time has 18 306 inhabitants.
  • Finnøy has 3 147 inhabitants.
  • Rennesøy has 4 794 inhabitants.
  • Gjesdal has 11 600 inhabitants.
  • Lund has 3 247 inhabitants.
  • Bjerkreim has 2 861 inhabitants.
  • Sokndal has 3 309 inhabitants.
  • Sirdal has 1 838 inhabitants.
  • Eigersund has 14 916 inhabitants.

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Last updated:  2015-05-21
Wharf houses at the quayside in Stavanger, Norway - Photo: Region Stavanger
Wharf houses at the quayside in Stavanger, Norway
Playing on Solastranda Beach outside Stavanger, Norway - Photo: Region Stavanger
Playing on Solastranda Beach outside Stavanger, Norway
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Project Bandaloop - dance performances outdoor in the Stavanger Region, Norway - Photo: Peter McBride

Key facts about the Stavanger Region

The Stavanger region is an area of contrasts, from quiet mountain areas for hiking to a vibrant university city with many culinary delights.

Key facts about the Stavanger Region

Source: Visitnorway

About the Stavanger region

Tourist information in the Stavanger region

The Tourist Information Offices in the Stavanger region can help you with just about any travel-related query, from activity tips to booking hotels.

Tourist information in Sirdal

There are two tourist information offices in Sirdal. Here you will find all the information you need to plan your holiday in the area.

Key facts about Sirdal

The community centre of Sirdal is Tonstad, Norway's capital of hydro electrical power development.

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