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Fagn, Trondheim
Home of Nordic flavours.
Photo: Berre kommunikasjon

Here are the Norwegian Michelin 2019 restaurants

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Oslo restaurant Maaemo keeps its three stars in this year’s edition of the prestigious guide, whilst Fagn and Credo, both in Trondheim, joins the exclusive club with one Michelin star each.

Eight Norwegian restaurants are now included in the crème de la crème of Nordic eateries, and the Norwegian star count has reached ten.

Two new Norwegian restaurants join the ranks

The newcomers in this exclusive company are the Trondheim restaurants Fagn and Credo. Led by chef Heidi Bjerkan, who is Norway’s first female Michelin chef, Credo also received the first Michelin Nordic Guide Sustainability Award.

“It is a great feeling. And the best thing is actually that we got the price for being the most sustainable restaurant”, Bjerkan says to the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation.

In addition to Fagn and Credo, Norway is featured with six eateries in the guide. Maaemo, along with Danish restaurant Geranium and Stockholm’s Frantzén, is the only one in the Nordics with three stars.

Statholdergaarden in Oslo keeps the star they’ve held for 21 years, whilst one-star restaurants Galt, Kontrast, Sabi Omakase, and Re-Naa continues the proud tradition they’ve been part of for the last years.

Restaurants that are worth the trip

In the culinary world, no distinction is more honourable than being included in the Michelin Guide, which was first published in 1900.

The publication was the brainchild of tyre manufacturing brothers André and Edouard Michelin and started out as a practical guide for motorists in France. But from the 1930s onwards, the guide was geographically expanded and thematically narrowed, with an annual distribution of stars to Europe’s greatest restaurants.

Three stars in Guide Michelin means that the restaurant is “worth a special journey”, two stars signifies that the food is “worth a detour”, and one star suggests “a very good restaurant in its category”.

The Norwegian Michelin restaurants

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