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Supervention II, Galdhøpiggen Supervention II, Galdhøpiggen Supervention II, Galdhøpiggen
Supervention II, Galdhøpiggen Supervention II, Galdhøpiggen
Credits
Supervention II, Galdhøpiggen.
Photo: Sverre Hjørnevik
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Watch the world’s first skiing loop

Action sport documentary “Supervention 2” shows Norwegian nature
at its finest.

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The Norwegian ski and snowboarding film “Supervention” was a major hit in Norwegian cinemas back in 2013, and it soon found international popularity through services like Netflix and iTunes.

One clip alone, distributed via Facebook, had ten million views.

The sequel “Supervention 2” is continuing the success. A few weeks into its theatrical run, it got rave reviews and surpassed its predecessor in terms of ticket sales.

Here’s a look at the trailer.

Please note that the trailer shows professionals performing carefully prepared stunts. Skiers with average skills should not try to copy this, or behave in a way that put their own or other people’s health at risk.

“We wanted to showcase what was happening on the outskirts of organized sports, all those people just playing around on skis and snowboards in the mountains that you rarely hear of elsewhere”, producer/director Filip Christensen (28) says.

Christensen (who shares directing duties with Even Sigstad, Jan Petter Aarskog and Lasse Nyhaugen) has been touring the film to an overwhelming response from the audience.

“Nature is the common theme throughout the movie, so a lot of Norwegians tell us that seeing the movie makes them feel proud of the country they live in. We’re covering all parts of Norway, with Northern and Western Norway being the standouts. On a big screen, Norwegian nature just sucks you right in.”

Supervention II, Lofoten

“Supervention 2” features athletes like Olympic gold medalist Aksel Lund Svindal, snowboard legend Terje Håkonsen and X-Games competitor Anders Back, with shots taking place everywhere from Lofoten, Vesterålen, Romsdalen and The Northwest Region to Lillehammer, Gjøvik and Oslo.

One of the highlights of the film is jibber Anders Backe’s attempt to perform a jump over the Globus sculpture placed on the North Cape plateau. It was a stunt that required extensive planning and permissions – too much velocity, and he could have gone over the edge of the plateau.

A lot of the athletes in the film talk about holding themselves to ever increasing standards and inventing new challenges for themselves. They present their wild ideas to Christensen, who tries to help them realize their dreams as best he can through grass roots engineering.

The stunt in “Supervention 2” he is most proud of is the one where swedish Olympian skier Jesper Tjäder successfully performs the world’s first skiing loop.

“This was an insane achievement that we were working on for two years and several hundred attempts on skis. At first we constructed a loop in Sweden, and then we moved it to the Galdhøpiggen summer skiing resort where we built it up three times”, Christensen says.

“Jesper had to figure out his velocity and pressure going in, as well as how to lock himself into the loop all the way, even when upside down. There was a lot of thought put in, a lot of sketches and ideas about angles.”

Emotionally, this work proved to be a rollercoaster for Christensen, who midway in the process became convinced they wouldn’t be able to pull it off. In addition, the shots were physically hard on Tjäder.

“As you can tell from the trailer, the first attempt did not go well. And he fell pretty hard on the day everything worked as well. The great thing about Jesper Tjäder is that he is like a cat, he can adjust no matter what. And when it all comes together, the rush of victory is hard to describe. There have been many tears of joy during this production.”

Supervention II
Credits
Supervention II.
Photo: Field Productions

Credits
Supervention II.
Photo: Field Productions

The athletes in Christensens film have all opted for extreme lives where pushing boundaries is the norm. The risk of injury is very much real, but actual injuries were hardly seen during the years spent making the film.

“These are people who are very calculating and thorough in everything they do. Their experience is at a level where they leave themselves margins of error so they can rein themselves in should anything happen. Being able to show that these are not just crazies risking their lives every day was a nice touch.”

Christensen hopes that the film will inspire audiences to go out and try these sports for themselves, though not necessarily in the breakneck manner of the athletes featured in his documentary.

“People should be inspired to challenge themselves, no matter what level they are at.”

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