TRAVEL ALERT! Important information about the Coronavirus situation in Norway
Dynamic Variation:
Offers
x

There was not an exact match for the language you toggled to. You have been redirected to the nearest matching page within this section.

Choose Language
Toggling to another language will take you to the matching page or nearest matching page within that selection.
Search & Book Sponsored Links
Search
or search all of Norway
Hikers enjoying view from Mount Fløyen in Bergen, Fjord Norway
Hikers enjoying view from Mount Fløyen in Bergen, Fjord Norway
Fløyen in Bergen.
Photo: Sverre Hjørnevik / Fjordnorway.com
Fløyen in Bergen.
Photo: Sverre Hjørnevik / Fjordnorway.com
From concrete to trails

5 city hikes with incredible views

Can’t decide between a city break and a hiking holiday? Norway’s largest towns give you the best of two worlds – both urban life and unspoilt nature! Here are five tips for hiking in the city.

    Norway’s largest cities are buzzing with energy, from trendy neighbourhoods and local food to fashion and art scenes. However, you don’t have to walk far to discover the country’s striking contrasts.

    The cities are also home to a wealth of steep hills and viewpoints, with popular hiking trails that suit all levels. Every day, Norwegians of all ages juggle between urban activities and nature adventures. For many locals, this is simply a way of life.

    Join us on five amazing city-to-mountain hikes!

  • Oslo hillcrest hike: Vettakollen in Nordmarka

    Access: Approximately 1.2 kilometres each way
    Effort level: easy
    Above sea level: 419 metres

    If you want to escape the hustle and bustle of Oslo, you’re in for a treat. Located just 1.2 kilometres from the metro stop with the same name, the Vettakollen hillcrest is one of the most accessible hikes from the city centre.

    Follow the path into Oslo’s “backyard” – the Nordmarka forest – and be rewarded with a panoramic view of the capital.

    While you’re in Oslo: Get insider tips from locals on how to best spend a long weekend in the capital. Find nature-based adventures in the city centre, go island hopping in the Oslofjord or experience the city by bike. You’ll also want to walk on the roof of the Opera House, explore fantastic street art, and check out the restaurant& scene. And if you enjoyed the forest hike, Oslomarka has an abundance of other forest roads and paths to offer.

  • Bergen mountain hike: Fløyen

    Access: 6–10 kilometres
    Effort level: medium
    Above sea level: 400 metres

    When it comes to stunning views and accessible paths, Bergen is hard to beat. With steep mountains as a backdrop, the city is idyllically situated by the fjord. Start your day hiking in the mountains, then make your way down and experience the pulse of the city.

    Visit Bergen suggests a guided tour on Mount Fløyen, a peak rising 400 metres above sea level. If you don’t want to hike to the starting point, you can jump on the Fløibanen funicular to join one of the hikes on the mountain. During your tour, you’ll walk along marked trails through unspoilt nature while witnessing the scenic city from different angles.

    While you’re in Bergen: Get some hot tips for how best to spend a weekend in the fjord capital. Of course, you’ll visit the UNESCO listed Hanseatic wharf Bryggen – but you should also take a look at what’s behind the facade! And If you’re considering a day trip to Flåm, know that the experience is even cooler in winter.

  • Tromsø mountain hike: Fløya

    Access: Depends on which route you choose
    Effort level: easy
    Above sea level: 671 metres

    “The view from Fløya is formidable. You can spot every part of Tromsø and the surrounding islands. This is also the city’s best place to experience the midnight sun”, says Anne Marit Vik of Visit Tromsø.

    There are several ways to get to the top. Some choose to ride the cable car to Storsteinen and then walk further up the hill. Others climb the 324 steps of the Sherpa staircase that starts close to the lower station cable car station.

    While you’re in Tromsø: Plan your long weekend in the Arctic city with top tips from the locals. If you’re visiting in winter, be on the lookout for northern lights! In the Lyngen Alps close to the city you can go hiking, mountain biking, and skiing, and when you’re hungry, Tromsø offers Arctic food with a modern take.

  • Stavanger mountain hike: Dalsnuten

    Access: 2-hour hike
    Effort level: easy
    Above sea level: 324 metres

    Discover some of the underrated views of the Stavanger region! Dalsnuten viewpoint in Sandnes is perfect if you’re looking for an easy hike. The route includes everything from marked trails and steep hills to small lakes suitable for swimming. And don’t forget to bring a “matpakke” (packed lunch). Nothing beats a snack after a successful hike.

    While you’re in the Stavanger region: Spend a weekend in true Stavanger style! Take a stroll through Old Stavanger and enjoy a great meal afterwards. This part of Norway is also known for attractions such as Preikestolen (“the Pulpit Rock”) and Kjeragbolten, but the varied landscape of Ryfylke and the Lysefjord area offers plenty of other picturesque alternatives.

  • Trondheim hillcrest hike: Storheia

    Access: Approximately 5 kilometres each way
    Effort level: easy
    Above sea level: 565 metres

    Planning a trip to Trondheim? In addition to charming shopping streets and trendy eateries, Norway’s third-largest city is home to scenic recreation areas ideal for trekking. The hike to Trondheim’s highest point Storheia is a popular one among the locals.

    The trip is suitable for all levels, and when you make it to the top, you are rewarded with a jaw-dropping view of the Trondheimsfjord and the Fosen peninsula.

    While you’re in Trondheim: Explore the city local style or go on a historic walk through the older neighbourhoods. Also, make sure you find out why Trondheim is called the home of the Nordic flavours! And if you enjoy longer hikes – why not do a pilgrimage to get here?

    View from Storheia in Trondheim, Norway
    Storheia in Trondheim.
    Photo: Martin Ystenes
  • Sustainability in Norway

    Take only pictures, keep only memories

    Norway is a country of outstanding natural beauty. Preserving this landscape, its communities, and the way of life, is essential for locals and visitors alike.

    Norwegian philosophy is very much that conservation is everyone’s responsibility.

    The locals try to leave as small a footprint as possible. Leave it as you would like to find it is the mantra, regardless of where you are.

    It is all about the quality of life. Not only now, but for the time to come as well.

    Travel green in Norway

Go on a city break!

×
  • Filters
    Filter Your Search
    TripAdvisor Symbol
    • Show More
    • No available filters
    • Show More
    • No available filters
    Clear Filters
  • View
  • Sort By
Filter Your Search
TripAdvisor Symbol
  • Show More
  • No available filters
  • Show More
  • No available filters
Clear Filters
Back To Top

Take advantage of top offers

See our selection of companies that work hard to make you happy all through your trip.

Get inspired

We have collected some articles you might also like.

Your Recently Viewed Pages

Back to top