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Eastern Norway Grenland Kragerø

Jomfruland National Park

  • 35 58 61 53
  •  /  km From You
Overview

Jomfruland National Park was established on 16 December 2016 and covers an area of 117 km2(45 sq mi), including the islands of Jomfruland and Stråholmen. About 98% in the park area is sea.

Jomfruland National Park was established on 16 December 2016 and covers an area of 117 km2(45 sq mi), including the islands of Jomfruland and Stråholmen. About 98% in the park area is sea.

Rare species at the sandy coast. Please watch your steps!

Here at Øitangen (Jomfruland)  you can go hiking, swimming, photographing, fishing and picking berries. But – show respect for the rare species.
The dry meadows and open sandy areas of Øitangen and Sandbakken are home to many rare plants and insects. This area and Lista used to be the most important areas in the country for sea holly. The antlion myrmeleon bore and osmia maritima is also highly threatened species, and has their nests in the sand dunes. Blushing waxcap is one of the ten red list fungi that live in these natural meadows. Please do not step on the plants or in the funnel-sapped pits in the open sand.

Hollow and dead trees are full of life. It´s important to preserve the forest.

The oak and hazel woodland in the north of Jomfruland is probably the best kept on the entire coast, with old, hollow and dead trees that house a rich diversity of insects and fungi.
Oaks live for a long time and often become hollow. When they die they become existential for many species. Oaks attract more species than any other type of tree - at least 1500 different. One oak tree can inhabit more insects than there are people in Oslo. In order to preserve the diversity of species and the biological assets, we therefor let dead oaks stand or lie on the ground.

 

 

 

 

 

 


  • Last Updated:
  • Source: Kragerø Turistkontor
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