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Eastern Norway Viken ASKER

Maud and Amundsens polar history

  • Sagene båthavn, Vestre Strandvei, Asker
  •  /  km From You
Overview

Roald Amundsen was the first man to reach the South Pole. After this expedition he planned a trip to the Arctic. His ship Maud has now returned to Vollen and can be admired in the harbour of Tofte. Combine the polar history and Maud with a visit to the Oslofjord museum for a nice daytrip outside Oslo.

Roald Amundsen's polar ship Maud has returned to Asker

101 years after Maud's launch in Vollen, the polar ship has returned home after a long voyage from Cambridge Bay in Canada and is now in storage in Tofte.

Amundsen - the first man to reach the South Pole

Roald Amundsen secretly planned the South Pole expedition when he built the ship "Fram" and the members of the expedition became the first in history to reach the South Pole point on December 4, 1911, five weeks before the expedition of Robert F. Scott made it there on his second attempt.

From Vollen to the North Pole

The polar ship Maud was built at Christian Jensen's ship wharf in Vollen. The client was Roald Amundsen who planned an expedition to the Arctic, where the goal was to do research in these areas and hopefully reach the North Pole. In June 7, 1917, Maud was completed and was launched where the Oslo Fjord Museum is located today. In  the summer of 1918, "Maud" finally sails from Oslo towards the northeast passage. Attempts were made to drift across the Arctic Ocean without success, and other attempts were made to reach the North Pole by plane. The boat remained behind, and after 80 years on the seabed in the northwest passage, the ship was transported home to Vollen in August 2018.
The scientific results from the expedition are still relevant, but Roald Amundsen encountered several obstacles and the ship never reached the North Pole. Amundsen went bankrupt in 1925 and Maud was sold at forced auction. She eventually sank in Cambridge Bay, Canada, where she lay on the ocean floor for 80 years. Maud is in storage in Sagene Båthavn on Tofte pending a permanent «Maud house».

The Oslofjord Museum

At the Oslofjord Museum, you can see an impressive collection of old wooden boats, learn about life in the sea and the history associated with leasure boats on the Oslo Fjord. The children find it fun to make an boat driven by elastics that can be tested in the pool.

Access to Vollen can be done by scheduled ferry or bus. The trip to Maud in Tofte is best made by car. Great day trip to combine with visits to local beaches, restaurants and coastal galleries.
 


  • Last Updated:
  • Source: Visit Greater Oslo
Statens Kartverk, Geovekst og kommuner - Geodata AS
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