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Hammerfest

Arctic city Hammerfest rises dramatically like a mirage on the horizon of Finnmark's barren coastline.

Surrounded by mountains, sandy beaches, and stunning coastal landscapes, Hammerfest is an excellent starting point for an active holiday!

For the best panoramic views, hike up the zigzag path to the top of Salen hill, just a 15-minute walk from the city centre!

The Struve Geodetic Arc marks the location that was once used to work out the size of the Earth, and is now on UNESCO's World Heritage list!

Wait, is that a ... camel?

That's right! Join a camel safari, or try to spot other wildlife like reindeer, eagles and whales. There is so much to see!

If you are a true fishing enthusiast – this is the place to be!

Here, you will find some of Norway’s best spots to catch big trophy fish, both in the sea and the nearby lakes and rivers.

Want to see both the midnight sun and white, tropical looking beaches? Hammerfest has both.

Just be aware that the water may be a bit chilly ... it's for real Vikings!

After a long day of activities, wind down in a dome while watching the northern lights (in the wintertime, if you are in luck), or stay at a comfy hotel in the city.

An urban haven on a dramatic and sparsely inhabited coast, Hammerfest is the world's northernmost city with more than 10,000 inhabitants. It's full of life and outdoor adventure!

For hiking enthusiasts, Hammerfest is a definite winner. The landscape may be barren, but it offers good hiking and gentle ascents. It's easy to navigate by following the coastline and mountain peaks.

Try Tyventrappa Sherpa stairway for stunning views of the Sørøysundet strait from Mount Tyven – under the midnight sun or the northern lights – from a cabin that has won awards for its unique design. Shelter there if you experience some of the Finnmark coast's stormy weather.

When cruise ships are in port, the city assumes an almost carnival-like atmosphere. In recent years, Hammerfest has begun to emerge as Finnmark's culinary capital. When it's time for a bite to eat, enjoy everything from a traditional Sami dish to fantastic sushi.

There are several options for getting to Hammerfest.

Being one of the oldest cities in Norway, it might strike you as odd how modern Hammerfest looks. The city's history includes various attempts by men and Mother Nature to wipe it from the map. The most drastic attempt was made by the Nazis in 1945, when the order came down that “no building be left standing”. Gjenreisningsmuseet, the Museum of Reconstruction, commemorates the cold, bleak years following the war's destruction. Today, many colourful houses from the 1950s dot the city.

Find more inspiration on Hammerfest’s official website.

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Attractions | Where to stay | Transport

Attractions in Hammerfest

Where to stay

Getting here and around

Get in-depth travel information on Hammerfest's official website.

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Seasons and climate

In spite of its location in the far north, Hammerfest has no permafrost as the annual temperature is approximately 2 °C (36 °F). The temperature varies from an average −5 °C (23 °F) in January to 11 °C (52 °F) in July.

The driest months are May, June, and July, with an average of 50 millimetres (2 inches) of rainfall. The wettest period is October through December.

During the summer months, there is continuous daylight, while during winter, the sun does not rise above the horizon. Read more about the midnight sun.

Get the latest weather forecast on yr.no.

Or check out or northern lights forecast.

Read more about the northern lights.

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