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Geirangerfjord.
Photo: Mattias Fredriksson/ Visitnorway.com
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One for the road

The growing interest for road cycling in Norway goes hand in hand with the popularity of cycling as a sport, fuelled by successful cyclists like Thor Hushovd.


Top 5 cycling routes in the mountains

Road cycling in the mountains
Skykula
Skykula
Depart from lake Ørsdalsvatnet to get the most out of the challenging uphill part of the route.
Skykula
One of the steepest roads in Northern Europe, built during 1842-1846. The road has 13 hairpin bends, with Stalheim Hotel located at the top… Read more
Stalheimskleiva
Juvass
Galdhøpiggvegen
One of Europe’s toughest uphill routes is found in the county of Oppland.
Galdhøpiggvegen
Experience Norway´s westernmost viewpoint with mainland connection - 496 metres above the sea! On clear days you have a marvellous panoramic view in… Read more
West Cape
Kaperskaret
Kaperskaret
An engineering marvel way up north at the outermost part of Senja.
Kaperskaret
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    Challenging mountain roads are waiting all over Norway. Pleasures on a high level are shared by Geir Stian Ulstein, the recognized mountain cycling enthusiast behind the reference guide book Bakker & Berg.

    Please note that these tips for challenging road cycling mostly involve some transport of bikes by car. The local travel destinations will point out suitable points of departure with parking. Contact them to plan your trip and to make the most out of your road cycling.

    1. Skykula

    A marvellous tour out of the ordinary through the county of Rogaland in the Stavanger region. Depart from Ørsdalsvatnet to get the most out of the challenging uphill part of the route. There are plenty of good opportunities for dining along the way back to the coastal city of Egersund.

    Skykula
    Credits
    Skykula.
    Photo: Tor Simen Ulstein

    Credits
    Skykula.
    Photo: Tor Simen Ulstein

    Dynamic Variation:
    Stalheimskleiva
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    Stalheimskleiva.
    Photo: Tor Simen Ulstein

    Cycle Stalheimskleiva ›

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    Stalheimskleiva.
    Photo: Tor Simen Ulstein


    Dynamic Variation:
    Juvass
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    Juvass.
    Photo: Tor Simen Ulstein

    Cycle Galdhøpiggvegen

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    Juvass.
    Photo: Tor Simen Ulstein

    4. Vestkapp

    Selje municipality in the county of Sogn & Fjordane offers some of Norway’s best short uphill routes, with Vestkapp (the West Cape) as the most spectacular. Fix your eyes at the spherical weather station on the top at the end of the road, surrounded by a panoramic view of the sea.

    Vestkapp
    Credits
    Vestkapp.
    Photo: Tor Simen Ulstein

    Cycle Vestkapp ›

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    Vestkapp.
    Photo: Tor Simen Ulstein

    5. Kaperskaret

    An engineering marvel way up north at the outermost part of Senja, Norway’s second largest island, in the county of Troms. Whether you choose the shortest route uphill or the longer route around Senja you will be able to enjoy twisting roads, waterfalls and sea views. For a tasty lunch, continue towards Finnsnes og Hamn.

    Kaperskaret
    Credits
    Kaperskaret.
    Photo: Tor Simen Ulstein

    Cycle Kaperskaret ›

    Credits
    Kaperskaret.
    Photo: Tor Simen Ulstein

    Other places to go cycling in Norway


    Get inspired


    Safety on two wheels

    Tips to keep you on the straight and narrow

    When cycling on the roads in Norway, the same traffic regulations and road signs apply to you as to cars and other vehicles: Keep to the right, give way to those coming from your right, and don’t drink and bike.

    1. Follow general traffic regulations and road signs.
    2. You may cycle on the pavement, but adapt your speed.
    3. You may not cycle on motorways and dual carriageways.
    4. Before you turn, indicate the direction by extending your hand.
    5. Always wear a helmet when cycling.
    6. A high visibility vest is a good idea, especially on busy roads.
    7. Only children under the age of 10 may be carried as passengers.

    Your bike must have

    • In darkness and poor visibility: white or yellow light in the front, and a red light in the back
    • A red reflector in the rear
    • White or yellow reflectors on the pedals
    • Two brakes that work independently of each other
    • A bicycle bell

    See all our top lists