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Road cycling, Geirangerfjord Geirangerfjord
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Road cycling, Geirangerfjord.
Photo: Mattias Fredriksson/visitnorway.com
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A bicycling nation in the making

The growing interest for cycling in Norway can in part be attributed to the popularity of cycling as a sport, where Norwegian cyclists like Thor Hushovd have had great success. 

If you want to go road cycling on your holiday in Norway, there are several options. You could, for instance, combine a visit to the mountainous west of Fjord Norway with a few day trips by bike. This is where some of the most famous cycling roads are located – like Rallarvegen, a ride on gravel roads through the spectacular highland area from the outskirts of the Hardangervidda Plateau to Flåm.

In recent years, a lot has been done to make it easier for those travelling by bike, both in Fjord Norway and places like Northern Norway and Trøndelag. Places to rent bicycles, and accommodation and eateries facilitated for bikers, are becoming increasingly common.

“If I ever fancy an easy paced spot for cycling, then there is no better place to head for than Norway's Lofoten Islands. Situated above the Arctic Circle, they are surely among the most beautiful places on earth.” This is how Andrew Straw, director of the tour operator Saddle Skedaddle, described his favourite cycling spot the Lofoten Islands in the British newspaper The Guardian.

Before you hit the road, please note that it´s forbidden to ride a bike in half of the tunnels in Norway. See an overview of Norwegian tunnels

 

Top 5 cycling routes in the mountains

Challenging mountain roads are waiting all over Norway. Pleasures on a high level are shared by Geir Stian Ulstein, the recognized mountain cycling enthusiast behind the reference guide book Bakker & Berg.

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Map source: Kartverket (Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0)

1. Skykula

A marvellous tour out of the ordinary in the county of Rogaland. Depart from Ørsdalsvatnet to get the most out of the challenging uphill part of the route. There are plenty of good opportunities for dining along the way back to the coastal city of Egersund.

Skykula
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Skykula.
Photo: Tor Simen Ulstein

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Skykula.
Photo: Tor Simen Ulstein

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Juvås
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Juvås.
Photo: Tor Simen Ulstein

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Juvås.
Photo: Tor Simen Ulstein

4. Vestkapp

Selje municipality in the county of Sogn and Fjordane offers some of Norway’s best short uphill routes, with Vestkapp as the most spectacular. Fix your eyes at the spherical weather station on the top at the end of the road, surrounded by a panoramic view of the sea. (Photo: Tor Simen Ulstein)


5. Kaperskaret

An engineering marvel way up north at the outermost part of Senja, Norway’s second largest island in the county of Troms. Whether you choose the shortest route uphill or the longer route around Senja you will be able to enjoy twisting roads, waterfalls and sea views. For a tasty lunch, continue towards Finnsnes og Hamn. (Photo: Tor Simen Ulstein)

Thor Hushovd’s favourite cycling routes

Thor Hushovd is considered the greatest Norwegian cyclist of all times. Among his merits are winning The World Road Race Championship and several stages of Tour de France. He takes a rare break to talk about his preferred rides all over Norway that features what he loves the most: untouched nature. 

Tour chef’s favourite restaurants

“Norwegian food is world class”, states chef Henrik Orre, who combines his passions for cycling and cuisine by feeding Team Sky’s cyclists during Tour de France. His preferred restaurants in his home country Norway are all based on hand-picked, local ingredients and an easy-going, unpretentious atmosphere.

Other places to go cycling in Norway

Safety on two wheels

  1. Follow general traffic regulations and road signs.
  2. You may bike on the pavement, but adapt your speed.
  3. You may not bike on motorways and dual carriageways.
  4. Before you turn, indicate the direction by extending your hand.
  5. Always wear a helmet when biking. 
  6. A high visibility vest is a good idea, especially on busy roads.
  7. Only children under the age of 10 may be carried as passengers.
  8. Be aware that the weather changes quickly in the mountains. Always bring warm clothes and extra food and water.
Arendal
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Arendal.
Photo: Eirik Mykland

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Arendal.
Photo: Eirik Mykland

Your bike must have

  • In darkness and poor visibility: white or yellow light in the front, and a red light in the back
  • A red reflector in the rear
  • White or yellow reflectors on the pedals
  • Two brakes that work independently of each other
  • A bicycle bell

See all our top lists

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