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Are you wondering what to prioritise on Oslo Culture Night? We have the answer!

Published: September 11 2017

Just when everyone thought the festival season was over, the City of Oslo's Department of Cultural Affairs wows us with the country's largest one-day festival!

Friday 15 September, this year's Oslo Culture Night will take place and features 160 reasons to pass on Taco Night and lazing on the couch at home. The city's cultural venues will be bustling with life, with events that include dance, music, art, theatre, history, architecture, film, cultural exchange and literature - and best of all: all these good times are absolutely free!

"On Oslo Culture Night, everyone has an opportunity to design a unique night for themselves. Opening new doors and seeing the city from different perspectives. On our website, you can plan your own route and hit the ultimate cultural home run," says Frank Michaelsen, project manager at City of Oslo's Department of Cultural Affairs.

With 160 events to choose among, it can admittedly be hard to assess your options and find out what to prioritise. We have asked a number of local cultural figures for some tips!

No. 4
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No. 4.
Photo: Foto: Anne Valeur

Credits
No. 4.
Photo: Foto: Anne Valeur

No. 4

Julia Witek, Ingeborg Marie Mohn and Emilie Christensen make up the band No. 4. no4band.no / No. 4 on Spotify

"Culture Night is a great opportunity to experience something new and different. We recommend a visit to Sentralen to hear the Oslo Philharmonic and the Junior Orchestra from Barrat Due, or checking out the Installation with Supersilent at the Emanuel Vigeland Museum. Last, but not least, you should head over to Øvingshotellet where you can rehearse for free. It's a great place for making your own music!

Read more about these events Oslo Philharmonic at Sentralen, Installation with Supersilent and Free rehearsing at Øvingshotellet.

Anders Husa
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Anders Husa.
Photo: Hedda Kaupang

Credits
Anders Husa.
Photo: Hedda Kaupang

Anders Husa

food blogger, andershusa.com

"Losæter in Bjørvika is a unique place that everyone should see. An urban farm at the least likely location in the city, midway between the graffiti-ridden aeration towers of Oslo Tunnel and having Barcode as the backdrop. It is definitely worth going there just to walk around in the wonderful garden and look at all the exciting things they grow there.

Read more about this event Urban Agriculture in Bjørvika.

Ellen Wisløff
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Ellen Wisløff.
Photo: Privat

Credits
Ellen Wisløff.
Photo: Privat

Ellen Wisløff

is the person behind the Instagram account @renpoesi (i.e. pure poetry), and she will soon publish the poetry collections Mer ren poesi (Eng. More pure poetry) and Skitten poesi (Eng. Dirty poetry)

"Poetry Night at Cacadou is a must for me! I love the concept of caustic poetry, slam poetry and poesifilm (i.e. digital and visual poetry), and it also happens to be taking place at one of my old favourite pubs in the city. I think this will be an absolutely perfect evening, which will be capped off with burgers and beer at Munchies right up the street.

Read more about this event Poetry Night at Cacadou.

Ingrid Vold Bjørkamo
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Ingrid Vold Bjørkamo.
Photo: Privat

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Ingrid Vold Bjørkamo.
Photo: Privat

Ingrid Vold Bjørkamo

communications director at Oslo Art Association, oslokunstforening.no

"I would recommend that everyone visit Ekeberg Park to see Fujiko Nakaya's fog sculpture. The sculpture will only be there through this month and is uniquely adapted to the location, plants and weather conditions. In addition, I would encourage people to seek out buildings and locations in the city, which you would normally not have access to in the evenings such as the historic buildings in the Kvadraturen district — including the Oslo Art Association in Rådmannsgården and BOA in Anatomigården, and the Munch Museum. An evening visit to these places allows for a very special mood and cultural-historical perspective.


Read more about these events Art in Ekeberg Park, Oslo Art Association, Group 11 at BOA and Learn about the Munch Museum.

Amalie Eggen
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Amalie Eggen.
Photo: Inga-Lill Larsen

Credits
Amalie Eggen.
Photo: Inga-Lill Larsen
Amalie Eggen
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Amalie Eggen.
Photo: Kristin Aafløy Opdan

Credits
Amalie Eggen.
Photo: Kristin Aafløy Opdan

Amalie Eggen

is a member of the hip, hip dance crew, CRE8, and a dancer, musical artist, and actor.

amalieeggen.com / cre-8.no

"I plan on starting the day by kayaking in Oslo Fjord with Mad Goats Kayak School. I've always wanted to go kayaking, and also find this to be an excellent opportunity to see Oslo from a new angle. Then, I'm going to see the dance installation "Origami" in front of Oslo Central Station, where a performance artist balances on lines, trapezes and modified footholds while she swings an axe around her head. In the evening, I'll be in the audience at Schous Culture Station to watch students from Spin Off Forstudium create a performance based on improvisation through dance, movement and theatre. It's always exciting to see new talent and budding artists, and Spin Off has provided a home base to many of them over the years.

Read more about these events Kayaking in Oslo Fjord, The dance installation in front of Oslo Central Station, and Spin Off Forstudium in dance and theatre.

Knut Kristian Mohn
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Knut Kristian Mohn.
Photo: Eirik Evjen

Credits
Knut Kristian Mohn.
Photo: Eirik Evjen

Knut Kristian Mohn

Tenor and conductor for the Norwegian men's choir Birkelunden Mannskor, kkmohn.com / birkelundenmannskor.com

"I would recommend that everyone warm up by stopping by the live Jukebox at Youngstorget Square starting at 4:00 pm. There, you can get an intimate performance by four professional choir singers and even make song requests. (They sing very little by Justin Bieber, but a lot by Johan Sebastian Bach.) After that, you should head over to the Oslo Cathedral to hear Oslo Cathedral Boys Choir sing, or go to Oslo City Hall where the Christiania Men's Choir and I will perform two concerts filled with well-known and beloved Norwegian National Romantic gems. Finish off the evening in Frogner Church with Harald Sæverud's "Ballad of Revolt" - an epic work that must be heard live! It builds up from the gentle piano to the most intense fortissimo that makes the hairs on the back of my neck stand up."

Read more about these events Live Jukebox by the Norwegian Soloist Choir, Culture Night in the Cathedral, Concert with Christiania Men's Choir in the City Hall, and Frogner Church.

Looking for cultural tips in other Norwegian cities?

It is not only in Norway's capital city that cultural life is flourishing this month. In Bergen, upcoming events include attending a lunchtime concert at Troldhaugen, watching sea lion training, and viewing the paintings of artists including Nikolai Astrup and Pushwagner. Trondheim offers exhibitions on both Sami and Norwegian handicrafts, kayaking along Nidelven River and the Central-Norwegian semi-finals in Norwegian Championship Slam Poetry, while Stavanger entices visitors with 100-UGÅ - where several of the city's restaurants invite you to a tasting experience for only 100 kroner, Henrik Ibsen's "An Enemy of the People" at the Rogaland Theatre, and the exhibition "Free Air" by Kitty Kielland at the Stavanger Art Museum.

Oslo Kulturnatt
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Oslo Kulturnatt.
Photo: Illustrasjon: Fredrik Lien Bjørgmo

Credits
Oslo Kulturnatt.
Photo: Illustrasjon: Fredrik Lien Bjørgmo
Oslo Culture Night

Oslo Culture Night is Norway's largest one-day festival where the City of Oslo's Department of Cultural Affairs and Oslo's cultural community bid everyone a warm welcome to experience the city's cultural offerings for free. Culture Night seeks to pay homage to and highlight Oslo's cultural scene, and promote all the excellent cultural activities that are available in Oslo. In that way, both Oslo's residents and visitors alike will become better acquainted with the city's major and minor offerings.

The various events will take place at roughly 150 different locations, and each of them have their own opening hours. The earliest event starts at 11:00 am on Friday, and the latest one closes at 3:00 am on Saturday. To plan your day, you can prepare your own route on the event organiser's website.

Follow these links for info on many more cultural events in Bergen, Trondheim and Stavanger and in the rest of Norway.

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