Get the latest travel information
close
Dynamic Variation:
Offers
x

There was not an exact match for the language you toggled to. You have been redirected to the nearest matching page within this section.

Choose Language
Toggling to another language will take you to the matching page or nearest matching page within that selection.
Search & Book Sponsored Links
Search
or search all of Norway

Autumn in Norway

A colourful time to explore Norway

Døråldalen valley in Rondane .
Photo: Anders Gjengedal / Visitnorway.com
Døråldalen valley in Rondane .
Photo: Anders Gjengedal / Visitnorway.com

During the months of September, October, and November, the days get shorter, the air crisper, the food richer, and the colours more dazzling. Autumn is the perfect time for a city break – which in Norway can easily include both a mountain hike and a steaming hot spa.

The Norwegian autumn equals a wide range of temperatures and weather types. Summery vibes may last well into October, while the rain sometimes turns into snow in early November. But a sure sign that autumn is here is when the trees and heath turn yellow and red and the leaves start falling off the trees.

The splendid colours mean that nature is at its most dazzling in autumn. The mountain areas are especially beautiful this time of year, and many Norwegians go hiking in the mountains or forests with their family during the yearly school holiday in October.

Keep in mind that all the urban areas in Norway are located close to nature. The cities are far from overcrowded, and autumn is also a time for great cultural experiences, be it art exhibitions, literature festivals, or intimate club concerts with future global pop stars.

The autumn season is also a time for gathering together inside with hot chocolate and lit candles. The feeling of “kos” – the kind of instant happiness you get when you feel safe, warm, and good together – is very important when the days get shorter and cold rain drums against the windows.

Another important aspect of the season: It’s harvesting time. The Norwegian food culture takes some subtle turns this time of year, favouring local ingredients and slow-cooked and rich dishes suited for a chillier climate.

Local weather and climate

During autumn the land areas lose more heat than the sea, and eventually the coastal areas have the highest temperatures.

In September the outer part of the Oslofjord usually has the highest mean temperatures in Norway. Later in the autumn, the warmest areas are usually found on the coast of Rogaland and Hordaland in Fjord Norway.

Autumn usually gives way to winter as early as October, but more often in mid-to-late November. Differences between north and south are less pronounced than in the spring, though Northern Norway and mountainous regions get autumn temperatures earlier than the coastal and inland areas.

Credits: Annegrethes / Stine & jarlen / M. Dickson / Foap   

How to dress for autumn weather

Wind and rain can make moving outdoors in the autumn a wet experience, but you might also be lucky and see a last flare of summer weather with sun and blue skies. Predicting what you should wear can be difficult, but having access to wind- and rainproof outer clothing is always a good idea.

Inside this outer shell, dress in several thin layers of wool rather than one big fat sweater. It is far more flexible and makes it easier to control your temperature.

Norwegian wool regulates temperature. In addition, as opposed to cotton, wool will still provide insulation and provide you with some much-needed warmth even if you’re trapped in the rain.

Get the latest weather forecast

.
.

Check the local weather forecast at Yr.no, delivered by the Norwegian Meteorological Institute and the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK). Download Yr’s free weather app for iOS or Android.

The taste of autumn

This is the hunting and harvest season, when the forests abound with berries, mushrooms, and game.

Skarvheimen, Buskerud .
Photo: Thomas Rasmus Skaug / Visitnorway.com
Skarvheimen, Buskerud .
Photo: Thomas Rasmus Skaug / Visitnorway.com

City break in autumn

Enjoy the season in stress-free urban surroundings close to nature.

Frognerparken, Oslo .
Photo: Benjamin A. Ward / Visitnorway.com
Frognerparken, Oslo .
Photo: Benjamin A. Ward / Visitnorway.com

Explore autumn in Norway

Inspiring art exhibitions or a culinary experience – how would you spend your Norwegian autumn?

Spook-tacular

You will certainly get in the Halloween-mode at our most haunted – and haunting – destinations.

Akershus festning .
Photo: Per Mork / CC BY 2.0" > Per Mork / CC BY 2.0
Akershus festning .
Photo: Per Mork / CC BY 2.0" > Per Mork / CC BY 2.0

More seasonal adventures

Take advantage of top offers

See our selection of companies that work hard to make you happy all through your trip.

More autumn activities

There is no need to wait until you’re here to find out what you’d like to do. Filter your search and check out the offers below.

×
  • Filters
    Filter Your Search
    • Show More
    • No available filters
    Clear Filters
  • View
  • Sort By
Filter Your Search
  • Show More
  • No available filters
Clear Filters
Back To Top
Your Recently Viewed Pages

Back to top